HISTORY - Whats in a name?

Wells Fireworks was founded by Joseph Wells in 1837 in, Dartford, Kent; having learned his trade as an explosive lighter man on the River Thames in London.

Wells Fireworks quickly became the leading display company in the UK and established a reputation for the manufacture and display of the finest quality fireworks. Using the Wells “Crown Brand” the company displayed at Cowes and Henley Regattas, Coronations and Jubilees to the Royal Family. Securing an international reputation for excellence this led to high value commissions including the LA Olympics, the Squaw Valley Winter Olympics, Rose Bowl displays and designing the original fireworks shows for Disneyland in Florida.

After operating for nearly a century and a half, sadly in the late 1970s it became financially impossible to compete with the now widely available Chinese imports and Wells was forced to shut its manufacturing plant in Dartford. Led by Stuart Orr, a chemist at the plant, some of the employees took the Wells brand and moved the entire operation to West Sussex. Specialising in close proximity stage pyrotechnics for the entertainment industry, Wells continued its reputation for excellence and supplied to most of the UK’s leading fireworks companies.

In 2003 Wells Fireworks was purchased by Pyrojunkies. Who retained the Wells brand and moved the head office back to the original Dartford base in Kent. Pyrojunkies is a special effects company to the entertainment industry who specialise in concert touring, so Wells and Pyrojunkies Ltd was a natural fit.

Expanding the Wells manufacturing plant in Arundel West Sussex, the newly invigorated company is again an established exporter of fireworks around the globe. The Wells brand is internationally recognised for excellence and used on major live shows and concerts worldwide by renowned artist like Westlife, Pussy Cat Dolls, 50 Cent, The Darkness, Girls Aloud, and Mc Fly and used on large shows including X Factor Live and TV shows such as X Factor, Ant and Dec and Strictly come dancing.

The actual remains of a number of original buildings from the former factory can be seen in the Joyce Green area of Dartford. Due to development in the area, these buildings face an uncertain future.....